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CCSD students shine at regional, state science fairs; earn opportunity to compete at Intel International Science and Engineering Fair

Two students from the Cherry Creek School District will compete in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (Intel ISEF) May 10-15 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It is the world's largest, international, pre-college science competition, involving more than 1,700 high school students from more than 70 countries. The students showcase their independent research and compete for more than $5 million in prizes.

Ben Sheffer, a junior at Eaglecrest High School, and Hari Sowrirajan, a freshman at Cherry Creek High School, will compete in the senior division. They earned that opportunity by placing first and second respectively, in the Denver Metro Regional Science and Engineering Fair, held February 25 at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science.

Sheffer's winning project in the Physics and Astronomy category is titled "The Effects of Electron Beam Dose on the Visible Spectroscopic Signatures of Thin C60 Films." Sowrirajan's winning project in the Cellular and Molecular Biology category is "Nanoparticle-Induced Macrophage Atherogenesis."

"These students have worked all year either at home, in school or in a professional lab to pursue a research project of their design," said Ethan Dusto, a science teacher at Cherry Creek High School who works with the science fair participants. "All of the research and data taken for these projects was completed during their free time. It is amazing to see how much interest these young adults have in science and engineering and we are really excited to see how they do at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in May."

Cherry Creek Schools students also took top honors in the junior division of the Denver Metro Regional Science and Engineering Fair. Emhyr Subramanian, a seventh-grader at the Challenge School, and Pranav Subramanian, and eighth-grader at Campus Middle School, earned first and second place respectively.

Emhyr Subramanian's winning project in the Chemistry category is "Potential Biodegradable Alternatives to Current Petroleum-Based Surfactants for Oil Spill Cleanup." Pranav Subramanian's winning project in the Embedded Systems category is "Ultrasonic-based Optics Utilized for the Blind and Visually Impaired."

Those four students led a contingent of Cherry Creek Schools students who won an impressive array of honors at the Denver Metro Regional Science and Engineering Fair and the Colorado State Science and Engineering Fair, held April 9 at Colorado State University in Fort Collins. Twenty of the 24 students who advanced from the regional to the state fair were from the Cherry Creek School District. Please see the list below for CCSD results.

Congratulations to these outstanding students!

Results from the Denver Metro Regional Science and Engineering Fair. (The following students advanced from the regional to the state fair.)

Senior Division:

ECHS:

Ben Sheffer – Physics & Astronomy, 1st Place, The Effects of Electron Beam Dose on the Visible Spectroscopic Signatures of Thin C60 Films

CCHS:

Summit Byrne – Animal Science, 1st Place, The Effect of Cholesterol from Eggs on Mouse Respiration Rate

Emily Zislis – Animal Science, 2nd Place, The Effect of Genetically Modified Soybeans on the Weight of Mice

Eileen Xia – Biochemistry, 1st Place, Phosphatidylinositol-3 Kinase p110a Isoform Inhibits Antibody Class Switch

Alison Weinberger – Biomedical and Health Sciences, 1st Place, Is Homeopathy More than a Placebo? Assessing Homeopathic Principles Using a Fruit Fly Model

Hari Sowrirajan – Cellular and Molecular Biology, 1st Place, Nanoparticle-Induced Macrophage Atherogenesis

Sofia Antal – Chemistry, 1st Place, Growth and Testing of New Cocrystals: Part 2

Sirey Zhang – Computational Biology and Informatics, 1st Place, Pathway Analysis of Genetic Interactions in a Mouse Model of Familial ALS

Anu Khanna – Earth and Environmental Sciences, 1st Place, The Effects of an Ecological Stress on the Generations of Plants

Parker Revers – Earth and Environmental Sciences, 2nd Place, Temperature Fluctuation Impact on the Transfer of Disease in Aquatic Environments

Vindhyaa Pasupuleti – Earth and Environmental Sciences, 3rd Place, Do the Environmental Factors of a Tropical Climate versus a Desert Climate Effect the Vitamin C Levels of navel Oranges Grown There?

Sanjna Bhartiya and Apoorva Krishnan (team) – Energy:Chemical, 1st Place, Preventing the Degradation of Dye-Synthesized Solar Cells

Ethan Russon and Roark Veazey (team) – Environmental Engineering, 1st Place, Eco-Homes/Thermal Mass

Areefa Rahman – Materials Science, 1st Place, Saving the World with One Feather at a Time: The Amalgation of Polymers Using Chicken Feathers

Anit Tyagi – Microbiology, 1st Place, Diurnal Variability of E. coli in an Urban Stream

Avi Swartz, Tyler Giallanza, and Ian Johnson (team) – Systems Software, 1st Place, Developing a Class Scheduling Program with Minimum Conflicts for Large Schools

Junior Division:

Challenge MS

Sharonya Battula – Animal Science, 3rd Place, Animal Magnetoreception

Evelyn Bodoni – Behavioral and Social Sciences, 2nd Place, Whatever It Takes

Edwin Bodoni – Biomedical and Health Sciences, 1st Place, Dental Implants – The Healthier Alternative

Emhyr Subramanian – Chemistry, 1st Place, Potential Biodegradable Alternatives to Current Petroleum-Based Surfactants for Oil Spill Cleanup

Ilya Djibilov and Kidus Zelalem (team) – Chemistry, Honorable Mention, Desalinating Water by Directional Solvent Liquid Extraction using Decanoic Acid

Antonio Campos – Earth and Environmental Sciences, 1st Place, Why is Venice Sinking?

Advaita Singh – Earth and Environmental Sciences, 2nd Place, Effects of Ultraviolet Radiation on Planaria

Krithik Ramesh – Engineering Mechanics, 3rd Place, All About Wingtips!

Arnav Joshi – Microbiology, 3rd Place, Preventing the Rise of Superbugs

Campus MS

Pranav Subramanian – Embedded Systems, 1st Place, Ultrasonic-based Optics Utilized for the Blind and Visually Impaired

 

Results from the Colorado State Science and Engineering Fair:

Senior Division:

Animal Sciences:

2nd Place: Emily Zislis, The Effect of Genetically Modified Soybean Consumption on Mouse Weight, CCHS

Energy and Transportation

3rd Place: Sanjna Bhartiya and Apoorva Krishnan, Preventing the Degradation of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells, CCHS

Environmental Sciences:

4th Place: Parker Revers, Transmission of Ichthyophthirius Multifiliis in Aquatic Environment Dependent on Varying Temperature, CCHS

Mathematics and Computer Sciences:

2nd Place: Avi Swartz, Tyler Giallanza, and Ian Johnson, Developing a Class Scheduling Program with Minimum Conflicts for Large Schools, CCHS

Medicine and Health:

2nd Place: Sirey Zhang, Multiarray Data Analysis to Map the Cellular Interaction in a Mouse Model of Familial ALS, CCHS

3rd Place: Alison Weinberger, Is Homeopathy More Than A Placebo? Assessing Homeopathic Principles Using A Fruit Fly Model, CCHS

4th Place: Hari Sowrirajan, Nanoparticle-Induced Macrophage Atherogenesis, CCHS

Microbiology:

3rd Place: Anit Tyagi, Diurnal Variation of E. coli in an Urban Stream, CCHS

Honorable Mention: Eileen Xia, Phosphatidylinositol-3 Kinase p110a Isoform Inhibits Antibody Switch, CCHS

Physics:

Honorable Mention: Ben Sheffer, The Effects of Electron Beam Dose on the Visible Spectroscopic Signatures of Thin C60 Films, EHS

Junior Division:

Best CSEF Project:

3rd Place: Emhyr Subramanian, Potential Biodegradable Alternatives to Current Petroleum-Based Surfactants for Oil Spill Cleanup, Challenge School MS

Behavioral and Social Sciences:

Honorable Mention: Evelyn Bodoni, Whatever It Takes, Challenge School MS              

Chemistry:

1st Place: Emhyr Subramanian, Potential Biodegradable Alternatives to Current Petroleum-Based Surfactants for Oil Spill Cleanup, Challenge School MS

Earth and Space Sciences:

Honorable Mention: Antonio Campos, Why Is Venice Sinking?, Challenge School MS

Engineering:

2nd Place: Pranav Subramanian, Ultrasonic-Based Optics Utilized for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Campus MS

Environmental Science:

2nd Place: Advaita Singh, Effects of Ultrasonic Radiation on Planaria, Challenge MS

Medicine and Health:

2nd Place: Edwin Bodoni, Dental Implants: The Healthier Alternative, Challenge MS

Posted 4/28/2015 9:41 AM
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